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Office in the Garden

The reality is: nothing declares straightforward magnificence than having a timber garden office. First of all, when you say timber, the very first thing that is certain to cross you mind would be logs and that would be robust, wooden logs very similar to those used in log cabins. A timber garden office can afford you the same magnificence quite as simply if only you know the way to choose one that will best fit your space.

Only one note to consider though: though you can always hire a contractor to build your structure, you won't desire to deal with rising work costs, varying prices of the materials, building allows, wood stretched in and around your house, and the very long noisy months while the office is being constructed. So a more sensible choice would be to reserve a ready-to-ship model instead.

Here are a few valuable pointers on how you can select a timber garden office which will suit your wants.

1. Make sure that your space is about five meters away from your home and about 1 meter away from your land's boundaries (firewall, backyard hedge, fence, etc.). Please do not fall into the common trap of ordering a very large model and trying to fit it into a particularly tiny space; or getting an extremely petite model that you have no other option but take some of your work back into your house. The opposite is true if your area has too many days in a year under overcast skies.

2. This is a very straightforward energy saving practice you may want to practice. Lighter coloured structures have a tendency to reflect back sunlight and heat, which can help bring your household bills down. On the other hand, darker coloured structures soak up heat.

3. Select the model which will afford you the amount of natural illumination you are most happy with. Virtually all timber garden office models have large and numerous window setups. Again, if your area has too much sunlight, you may want to choose office models with fewer or smaller windows. This will also mean that you spend less money trying to fit blinds or curtains that would cut out some of the glare from particularly sunny days.